Iceland in Black and White

Back in September, we spent a few days in Iceland. It’s the land of waterfalls and for the record, the only ice we saw was in our drinks. The waterfalls were everywhere and I have to say some of them were simply breathtaking. What is it about waterfalls that intrigue us so much. Is it their beauty? Their size? Could be it be the enormous power that is so clear when one looks upon a waterfall? Perhaps, it’s a combination of many things. No doubt, for any photographer regardless of your experience or status level it has to be about the opportunity the “falls” before you present.

This majestic waterfall is known as Godafoss.  From what I understand, this curling horseshoe-shaped waterfall has had a key role in Icelandic history. We were told that back in the year 1000, the leader, Porgeirr Ljósvetningagoði had the unenviable task of choosing the official religion of Iceland. Most likely persuaded by the pressure of Christianity’s convert or die methods, he choose Christianity and then threw his idols of Norse deities into the falls. Godafoss, when translated means “waterfall of the gods”. Our guide then told us that Porgeirr secretly maintained allegiance to the Norse deities.

Here are the falls for your viewing pleasure in black and white with just a slight tinge of green.

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8 thoughts on “Iceland in Black and White

    1. I agree Iceland in winter does not sound good at all, although I understand the temperatures are actually a tad warmer then here in Canada. We went in mid-September and the weather was actually very nice…. Sweater weather so to speak!

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